Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnate)

passionflower

Family: Passifloraceae

Herbalists have a high regard for the soothing properties of passionflower and recommend it as a general nerve tonic to treat nervous stress. The Commission E approved its use for anxiety. Passionflower is used to gently relax the mind/body to prepare for a more restful nights sleep.

Common medicinal properties: Analgesic , Purgative, Sedative

Current Research: Effective for generalized anxiety.

Contraindications: Sedative medications (CNS depressants) interacts with PASSIONFLOWER

Parts Used:  Dried leaves and stems.

Constituents:  Apigenin and luteolin glycosides, vitexin, isovitexin and their c-glycosides, kaempferol, quercetin, and rutin; indole alkaloids (0.010.09%), mainly harman, harmaline, harmine; coumarin derivatives; cyanogenic glucosides (gynocardin); fatty acids (linoleic and linolenic); gum; maltol; phytosterols (stigmasterol); sugars (sucrose); and a trace of volatile oil

Folk applications:   Placed in the home to calm problems and bring peace. When carried, it attracts friends and creates popularity. Placed in a pillow it brings sleep.

Tincture R

Lavender (Lavandula spp) Monograph

Lavender (Lavandula spp)

eLAVENDER-botanicalFamily: Lamiaceae

Common medicinal properties: Analgesic, AntiCancer,Antifungal,  Antioxidant, Antiperspirant, Antirheumatic, AntiViral, Aromatic, Cardiac tonic cordial, Chlagogue, Cicatrisant, Cytophylactic, Deodorant/Perfumes, Diaporetic/Sudorific, Diuretic, Emmenagogue, Hypotensive, Insect repellents, Muscle Relaxant, Nervine, Parturient, Sedative, Splenic, Vermifuge, Vulnerary

Current Research:

Migraine. Some research suggests that rubbing 2 or 3 drops of lavender oil on the upper lip, so that the vapor is inhaled, might reduce migraine pain and nausea, and help stop the headache spreading.

Contraindications:
Sedative medications (Barbiturates) interacts with LAVENDER
Sedative medications (CNS depressants) interacts with LAVENDER

Parts Used: Flowers, leaves and stems

Constituents: volatile oil (up to 1.5%, containing linabol, linalyl acetate, lavendulyl acetate, terpinenol, cineole, camphor, borneol, pinene, limonene), tannins, coumarins (coumarin, umbelliferone, hemiarin), flavonoids, triterpenoids, rosmarinic acid

Folk applications:
Clothing smelling of lavender attracts love (thus the drawer sachets). Rub lavender against anything you want to attract a man. It is burned or smoldered to induce peacefulness and rest.It is carried to see ghosts.

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) monograph

feverfewFamily: Asteraceae

Common medicinal properties: Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory, Circulation, Febrifuge, Insect repellents

Current Research: Preventing migraine headache.  A randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial of feverfew in the prevention of migraine has yielded promising results.

Contraindications: Do not take feverfew if you are pregnant. Feverfew may cause your uterus to contract. This may raise the risk of miscarriage or preterm delivery. It’s also best to avoid using it when breastfeeding.

  • Parts Used: arial parts
  • Constituents: Sesquiterpene lactones (including parthenolide and santamarine), volatile oil, tannins

Folk stories and applications: Carried for protection against cold, fever and accident. The ancient Greeks called the herb “Parthenium,” supposedly because it was used medicinally to save the life of someone who had fallen from the Parthenon during its construction in the 5th century BC

Tincture Ratio: 1:5:dried flowers,leaves and stems: 40%

Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia) monograph

Echinacea-PFamily: Asteraceae

Herbalists do not agree on which species is best, E.purpurea,, E. pallida, or E.angustifolia, but all variants have phytochemicals that improve the immune system.

Common medicinal properties:  Anti-inflammatory, Antibacterial, AntiViral, Depurative, Emetic, and Immunostimulant

Current Research:

Common cold – Many scientific studies show that taking some echinacea products when cold symptoms are first noticed can modestly reduce symptoms of the common cold in adults. But other scientific studies show no benefit. The problem is that scientific studies have used different types of echinacea plants and different methods of preparation. Since the studies have not been consistent, it is not surprising that different studies show different results. If it helps for treating a cold, the benefit will likely be modest at best. It also isn’t clear whether echinacea can help PREVENT colds. Any benefit is likely to be modest.

Vaginal yeast infections. Taking echinacea and applying a medicated cream to the skin seems to lower the recurrence rate of infection to about 16% compared to 60.5% with econazole alone.
Contraindications:

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates) interacts with ECHINACEA

Caffeine interacts with ECHINACEA

Medications that decrease the immune system (Immunosuppressants) interacts with ECHINACEA

Parts Used:  Most often roots, stems and flowers are also used but are weaker

Constituents:  essential oil (including humulene and caryophylene), glycoside, polysaccharide, polyacetylenes, isobutylalklamines, resin, betaine, inulin, sesquiterpene.

Folk applications:  Used by American Indians as an offering to spirits to ensure and strengthen spells.

German Chamomile Monograph

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) Monograph

chamomileChamomile (Matricaria recutita)
Family: Asteraceae

Common medicinal properties:  Analgesic, Anodyne, Anti-inflammatory, Antidepressant, Antirheumatic, antispasmodic, Anti-Viral, Aromatic, Bitter, Carmenative, Cholagogue, Cicatrisant, Depurative, Diaphoretic, Diuretic, Emmenagogue, Febrifuge, Hepatic, Nervine, Sedative, Splenic, Stomachic, Vasoconstrictor, Vulnerary

Current Research: Research suggests that taking 220-1110 mg of German chamomile daily for 8 weeks reduces anxiety and depression in adults with anxiety disorder.

Contraindications: Should not be used with estrogen or sedative medications.

Parts Used: Chamomile flowers, tea, chamomile oil

Constituents: volatile oil (containing chamazulene, farnesene, bisabolol), flavonoids (including rutin and quercimertrin), coumarins, plant acids (including valerianic acid), fatty acids, cyanogenic glycosides, salicylate derivatives

Folk applications:  Used as hand wash to bring Money or ensure luck at gambling. Added to a bath to attract love. Used in sleep or meditation incenses. Sprinkled around a property to remove curses and create protection.

Tincture recipe: 1:3 ariel dried 40%